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About Mozambique                    Banking                   Communications                   Current News                    Electricity     

Embassies                   Game Reserves                Geography                 Health               History, Language & Culture     

Must see                   Road Travel                    Travel Advisories                  Useful Phrases            Visas           Weather

 

 

Botswana      Lesotho      Malawi      Mozambique       Namibia       Swaziland       South_Africa      Zambia        Zimbabwe

Botswana        Lesotho          Malawi       Mozambique     Namibia       Swaziland     South_Africa     Zambia       Zimbabwe

 

 

 

 

 

 


About Mozambique
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Mozambique is located on the South Eastern coast of Africa bordered by South Africa, Tanzania, Swaziland, Zambia, Malawi and Zimbabwe..

Mozambique is primarily coastal lowlands, which rise up toward the west to a plateau varying from 150 to 2300 metres above sea level

The largest rivers are the Limpopo in the south, Zambezi across the centre, the Save in the lower centre, and the Lugfenda in the north. The most significant lake is Lake Niassa. (Lake Malawi

 

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Adventures on a Mozambique Road Trip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Banking
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The import and export of local currency is not allowed. There are no restrictions on the import of foreign currency Travellers’ cheques are widely accepted It is best to take US Dollars or SA Rand to avoid or reduce commission. The South African Rand is widely accepted as a form of currency and accommodation prices are often quoted in Rand. Many hotels insists on payment in foreign currency so have a reasonable amount of foreign cash. One can’t rely on the acceptance of debit and credit cards especially out of the major cities.

Keep cash in reserve.

 

 

 

 

 




 Communications
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Mozambique
Telecom Operator Primary Activity Website
Telecomunicacoes de Mocambique E.E. Fixed www.tdm.mz
Telecomunicacoes Moveis de Mocambique, Lda. Mobile www.mcel.co.mz
VM SARL Mobile
Vodacom Mobile www.vm.co.mz

 

 

 

 

 


Current News Sources
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Embassies and Consulates
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This picture is not an accurate indication of Countries represented in Mozambique

 

 

 

 

 

 

Angola

Embassy of Angola in Maputo, Mozambique

Avenida Kenneth Kaunda, n 783, C.P. 2954, Maputo, Mozambique

Phone     (+258) 21 491 883, (+258) 21 483 691

Fax          (+258) 21 493 930

Email       embaixada.angola@tvcabo.co.mz

 

Argentina

Embassy of Argentina in Maputo, Mozambique

Rua dos Deportes 833, 9th floor, JAT V-1 building. Maputo (CP 🙂

Phone     (+258) 21 421 242/3/6

Fax          00 27 12 430 3521

Website http://http://emoza.cancilleria.gov.ar/

Email       emoza@cancilleria.gob.ar

 

Australia

Australian Consulate in Maputo, Mozambique

1571 Av Zimbabwe, Somerschield, Maputo, Mozambique

Phone     (258) 21 303 371, + 258 84 3009999

Fax          (258) 21 303 373

Email       mozhonoraryconsul@gmail.com

 

Belgium

Honorary Consulate of Belgium in Maputo, Mozambique

Avenida Kenneth Kaunda 470 , Maputo , Mozambique

Phone     +258 21 492 029, +258 21 492 009, +258 21 492 033

Fax          +258 21 491 987

Email       mjrcosta@tropical.co.mz; mariajoao.regocosta@diplobel.fed.be

 

Botswana

High Commission of Botswana in Maputo, Mozambique

Rua de Dar es Salaam, No. 141, Sommerschield, Maputo, Mozambique

Phone     (+258) 2124 3800

Fax          (+258) 2149 4917

Email       botmoz@gov.bw

 

Brazil

Embassy of Brazil in Maputo, Mozambique

Av. Kenneth Kaunda 296, C.P. 1167, Maputo , Mozambique

Phone     (+258) 2148-4800

Fax          (+258) 2148-4806

Website http://maputo.itamaraty.gov.br

Email       ebrasil@tdm.co.mz

 

Canada

High Commission of Canada in Maputo, Mozambique

Kenneth Kaunda Avenue, No. 1138, Maputo, Mozambique

Phone     (011 258 21) 492 623

Fax          (011 258 21) 492 667

Website http://www.maputo.gc.ca

Email       mputo@international.gc.ca

 

China

Chinese Embassy in Maputo, Mozambique

Av. Julius Nyerere No. 3142, Maputo, Mozambique

Phone     00258-21491560-200   00258-823262380

Fax          00258-21-491196

Email       chinaemb_mz@mfa.gov.cn

 

Denmark

Royal Danish Embassy in Mozambique

Avenida Julius Nyere No. 1162, Caixa Postal 4588, Maputo, Mozambique

Phone     +258 21 480 000

Fax          +258 21 48 00 10

Website http://www.ambmaputo.um.dk

Email       mpmamb@um.dk

 

Finland

Embassy of Finland in Maputo, Mozambique

Avenida Julius Nyerere 1128, P.O. Box 1663

Phone     +258-21 490 578, 482 400

Fax          +258-21 491 661, 491 662

Website http://www.finland.org.mz

Email       sanomat.map@formin.fi

 

France

Embassy of France in Maputo, Mozambique

2361 Av. Julius Nyerere

Phone     [258] (21) 48 46 00

Fax          [258] (21) 48 46 80

Website http://www.ambafrance-mz.org/

Email       ambafrancemz@tvcabo.co.mz

 

France

Consular Section of the Embassy of France in Maputo, Mozambique

2361 Av. Julius Nyerere

Phone     [258] (21) 48 46 76

Fax          [258] (21) 48 46 90

Website http://www.ambafrance-mz.org/

Email       cad.maputo-amba@diplomatie.gouv.fr

 

Germany

Embassy of Germany in Maputo, Mozambique

Rua Damião de Góis 506, Maputo

Phone     (00258 21) 48 27 00 / (00258 21) 49 27 14

Fax          (00258 21) 49 28 88

Website http://www.maputo.diplo.de

Email       germaemb@tvcabo.co.mz

 

Greece

Honorary Consulate of Greece in Maputo

930, Mao Tse Tung Ave.

Phone     (0025821) 310610-2

Fax          (0025821) 310613

Email       gerry@cimpogest.com

 

Iceland

Embassy of Iceland in Mozambique

Av. Zimbabwe 1694

Phone     +258 1 483 509

Fax          +258 1 483 511

Website http://www.iceland.org/mo/

Email       icemb.maputo@utn.stjr.is

 

India

High Commission of India in Maputo, Mozambique

Avenida Kenneth Kaunda No. 167, PO Box 4751

Phone     00-258-1-492437, 490717

Fax          00-258-1-492364

Website http://www.hicomind-maputo.org/

Email       hicomind@tvcabo.co.mz

 

Ireland

Embassy of Ireland in Mozambique

Avenida Julius Nyerere 3332

Phone     0025821 491 440

Fax          0025821 493 023

Email       Maputoembassy@dfa.ie

 

Italy

Embassy of Italy in Maputo, Mozambique

Av. Kenneth Kaunda 387

Phone     258-1-492229

Fax          2581) 492046

Website http://www.ambmaputo.esteri.it

Email       visti.maputo@esteri.it

 

Malawi

Malawian Embassy in Mozambique

Av. Kenneth Kaunda, 75, Caixa Postal 4148, Maputo, Mozambique

Phone     (+258) 21 492 676

Fax          (+258) 21 490 224

Email       malawmoz@virconn.com

 

Mauritius

High Commission of Mauritius in Maputo, Mozambique

Rue Dom Carlos, No. 42 Avenue de Zimbabwe Sommerschield, Maputo

Phone     01 494 624, 01 494 182

Fax          01 494 729

Email       mhcmoz@virconn.com

 

Netherlands

Embassy of Netherlands in Maputo, Mozambique

Av. Kwame Nkrumah, no 324, P.O. Box 1163

Phone     + 258 21 484 200

Fax          + 258 21 484 248

Website http://www.hollandinmozambique.org/

Email       map@minbuza.nl

 

Netherlands

Consulate of Netherlands in Beira, Mozambique

c/o Caminhos de Ferro de Mozambique, Largo dos CFM, P.O. Box 236, Beira – Mozambique

Phone     + 258 23 32 27 35

Fax          + 258 23 32 27 36

Email       c.mesquita@teledata.mz

 

Netherlands

Consulate of Netherlands in Nampula, Mozambique

Rua de Inhambane, no 36/36A, Bairro Muhavire

Phone     + 258 26 212970/218615

Fax          + 258 26 215497

Email       charlesphaff@gmail.com

 

Norway

Royal Norwegian Embassy in Maputo, Mozambique

C.P. 828, Av. Julius Nyerere 1162

Phone     + 258 21 480100/1/2/3/4

Fax          +258 21 480107, 485076

Website http://www.norway.org.mz/

Email       emb.maputo@mfa.no

 

Poland

Honorary Consulate of Poland in Mozambique

Rua Clarim de Chaves No. 39 , PO Box 4478

Phone     +258.21.329.111

Email       consulado_rp@wp.pl

 

Russia

Embassy of Russia in Maputo, Mozambique

C.P. 4666, Av. V. Lenine 2445

Phone     (+2581) 41-7372, 41-9872, 41-8478

Fax          (+2581) 41-7515

Email       embrus@tvcabo.co.mz

 

Seychelles

Consulate of Seychelles in Mozambique

Rua da Mesquita No.213, PO Box 4264

Phone     [258 21] 31 37 44, [258 21] 31 30 32

Fax          [258 21] 32 64 70, [258 21] 31 30 32

Email       con.generalseychelles@tdm.co.mz, consulgeneral.seychelles@tdm.co.mz

 

South Africa

South African High Commission in Maputo

Avenida Eduardo Mondlane 41 Caixa Postal 1120 Maputo, Caixa Postal 1120 Maputo,

Phone     + 258 21 243000

Fax          + 258 21 49 3029

Website                 http://-

Email       satrade@tropical.co.mz

 

Spain

Embassy of Spain in Maputo, Mozambique

Rua Damiao de Gois, 347 , Caixa Postal 1331, Maputo Mozambique

Phone     (+258) 21 49 20 25 / 27 / 30

Fax          (+258) 21 49 20 55 / (+258) 21 49 47 69

Email       emb.maputo@maec.es

 

Spain

Spain in Quelimane Mozambique

Avenida 7 de Setembro, 1495 Quelimane Mozambique

Phone     (+258) 24 21 56 12 / (+258) 825 026 170

Fax          (+258) 24 21 39 47

Email       –

 

Spain

Consulate of Spain in Pemba Mozambique

Avenida Eduardo Mondlane, Pemba Mozambique

Phone     (+258) 27 22 16 14 / (+258) 823 949 865

Email       –

 

Spain

Consulate of Spain in Beira Mozambique

Rua Armando Tivane, 6 Beira Mozambique

Phone     (+258) 23 32 50 58 / (+258) 821 594 830

Fax          (+258) 23 32 50 54

Email       –

 

Swaziland

Swazi High Commission in Maputo, Mozambique

Rua Luis Pasteur, 1271/63 Caixa Postal 4711 , Maputo, Mozambique

Phone     (+258) 21 491 601 / (+258) 21 492 451

Fax          (+258) 21 492 117

Email       –

 

Sweden

Embassy of Sweden in Maputo, Mozambique

Av. Julius Nyerere 1128, Maputo

Phone     +258 21 48 03 00

Fax          +258 21 48 03 90

Email       ambassaden.maputo@gov.se

 

Switzerland

Embassy of Switzerland in Maputo, Mozambique

Avenida Ahmed Sekou Touro 637 Caixa, postal 135, Maputo Mozambique

Phone`   (+258) 21 31 52 75 (+258) 21 36 05 00

Fax          (+258) 21 31 52 76

Website http://www.eda.admin.ch/maputo

Email       map.vertretung@eda.admin.ch

 

Tanzania

Embassy of Tanzania in Mozambique

Ujamaa House, P. O . Box 4515, Maputo, Mozambique

 

Phone     263-4) 721870, 722627,882265

Fax          (263-4) 724172

Email       safina@zebra.uem.mz

 

United States

American Embassy in Maputo, Mozambique

Avenida Kenneth Kaunda, 193, Caixa Postal 783, Maputo, Mozambique

Phone     (258) 21-49 27 97

Fax          (258) 21-49 01 14

Website http://maputo.usembassy.gov

Email       maputoirc@state.gov

 

Zambia

High Commission of Zambia in Maputo, Mozambique

Caixa Postal 4655, Avenida Kenneth Kaunda 1286, Caixa Postal 4655, Maputo, Mozambique

Phone     (+258-21) 491307 /492452

Fax          (+258-21) 491893

Email       zhcmap@tvcabo.co.mz

 

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwean Consulate General in Beira, Mozambique

617 Rua Francisco Dechange, Almeida Ponde Geo, P. O. Box 649, Beira, Mozambique

Phone     258-23-327950 / 327942

Fax          258-23-328942

Email       –

 

Zimbabwe

Embassy of Zimbabwe in Maputo, Mozambique

Av. Machava, 1657 Caixa Postal , 743 Maputo, Mozambique

Phone     (+258) (21) 490 404 / 488 877

Fax          (+258) 21 492 237

Email       zimmaputo@zimfa.gov.zw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Electricity Supply
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Electrical Power Electric Power is 220V – 240V running at 50Hz.
The Plug types used are: “Type C, F and M (South African)”

                                                                                                            

 

 

 

  TYPE D              TYPE G                 TYPE M (South African type)

 

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Game Reserves
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Viewing of Wildlife in Mozambique

 

 

Parks and reserves have been established for the protection of the wildlife. Here it is you who are the intruder and your presence is a privilege.

Game viewing is usually at its best during the dry season – in winter (May to August) and in the hot springtime months of September and October, when the animals are concentrating near rivers, pools and waterholes. The chances of spotting lions are better just after sunrise then at other times. In summer, most of the game tends to lie up during the heat of the day, so the recommended times to set out on drives are the early mornings and late afternoons. Elephants, though, are wide-awake and active in and around the rivers in the hotter hours.

Approach big game with caution; don’t make any unnecessary movement or noise, and be prepared to drive on quickly if warning signs appear (if, for instance, an elephant turns head-on to you and flaps its ears). Keep down-wind if possible; remember that just about any wild creature can be dangerous if startled, irritated or, most importantly, cornered. Do not under any circumstances cut off an animal’s line of retreat.

(Source Botswana Tourism)

 

 

Birdlife Botswana
BirdLife Botswana strives to conserve Botswana’s birds and their habitats.

Cheetah Conservation Botswana
Conserving the wild cheetah population of Botswana.

Kalahari Conservation Society (KCS)
Oldest environmental NGO in Botswana for the conservation of Botswana’s environment and wildlife resources.

Living With Elephants Foundation
Explore the relationship between the African Elephant and people.

Somarelang Tikologo
Environment Watch Botswana, a NGO that aims to monitor, protect and increase awareness about Botswana’s environment. Site offline, for information use the Wikipedia entry for Somarelang Tikologo

 

One of the most sought after wilderness destinations in the world, the Okavango Delta gives entrance to the spectacle of wild Africa such as dreams are made of – the heart-stopping excitement of big game viewing, the supreme tranquility and serenity of an untouched delta, and evocative scenes of extraordinary natural beauty.

A journey to the Okavango Delta – deep into Africa’s untouched interior – is like no other. Moving from wetland to dryland – traversing the meandering palm and papyrus fringed waterways, passing palm-fringed islands, and thick woodland, resplendent with lush vegetation, and rich in wildlife – reveals the many facets of this unique ecosystem, the largest intact inland delta in the world.

The Okavango Delta is situated deep within the Kalahari Basin, and is often referred to as the ‘jewel’ of the Kalahari.
That the Okavango exists at all – deep within this thirstland – seems remarkable. Shaped like a fan, the Delta is fed by the Okavango River, the third largest in southern Africa. It has been steadily developed over the millennia by millions of tonnes of sand carried down the river from Angola.

 

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Incredible Wildlife in the Okavango
(Source Botswana Tourism

There are three main geographical areas:

  1. the Panhandle
  2. the Delta
  3. dryland

The Panhandle begins at the Okavango’s northern reaches, at Mohembo, extending down for approximately 80 kilometres. Its corridor-like shape is contained within two parallel faults in the Earth’s crust. Here the river runs deep and wide and the swamps are perennially flooded. The dominant vegetation is vast papyrus beds and large stands of phoenix palms. The main tourist attractions of the Panhandle are fishing, birding and visiting the colourful villages that line its western fringes.

At Seronga, the fan-shaped Delta emerges, and the waters spill over the Delta, rejuvenating the landscape and creating stunning mosaics of channels, lagoons, ox-bow lakes, flooded grasslands and thousands upon thousands of islands of an endless variety of shapes and sizes. Many of the smaller islands are grandiose termitaria built by fungus-growing termites, one of 400 termite species in Africa, whose fantastic structures are a source of refuge and food for many animals.

The Delta region of the Okavango can vary in size from 15 000 square kilometres during drier periods to a staggering 22 000 square kilometres during wetter periods. Its dominant plant species are reeds, mokolwane palms, acacia, sycamore fig, sausage trees, raintrees and African mangosteen.

At the Delta’s lower reaches, the perennial swamps give way to seasonal swamps and flooded grasslands. To the southeast the third vegetation region becomes evident, as it changes to true dryland. There are three major land masses here: the Matsebi Ridge, Chief’s Island and the Moremi tongue. Here the vegetation is predominantly mophane, acacia and scrub bush and the land is dotted with pans. It is to this region that large numbers of mammals retreat during the dry winter months.

Major tourist attractions in the Delta and the dryland areas are game viewing, birding and boating, often in the traditional mokoro. The diversity and numbers of animals and birds can be staggering. A recent overview of the Okavango records 122 species of mammals, 71 species of fish, 444 species of birds, 64 species of reptiles and 1300 species of flowering plants. A successful rhino reintroduction programme in the Okavango now puts the population of White Rhino at approximately 35, and Black Rhino at 4.

 

 

Major species to be seen include:

Elephant, buffalo, giraffe, zebra, hippo,crocodile, rhino, red lechwe, waterbuck, reedbuck, duiker, impala, kudu, steenbok, wildebeest, hartebeest, sable, roan, tsessebe, lion, leopard, cheetah, genet, serval and caracal along with an immense variety of birds – land and water, resident and migratory, some of which are rare and endangered.

It should be noted, however, that game viewing very much depends on season, and water and food availability.

The Okavango is a proposed World Heritage Site. Its long-term conservation is ensured through government policy and regulations (though only Moremi Game Reserve has an official protected status), the efforts and initiatives of camps and lodges in its concessions, the recently launched Okavango Development Management Plan (ODMP) and its status as a Ramsar site, under IUCN, an agreement that limits its utilisation and development.

(Source Botswana Tourism

 

Khutse Game Reserve

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Because of its proximity, and relative accessibility, to the nation’s capital, Khutse game Reserve is a favourite retreat for Gaborone visitors or residents. The 240 kms drive takes the traveller through a number of interesting Kalahari villages, including the ‘gateway to the Kalahari,’ Molepolole.

Adjoining the Central Kalahari Game Reserve to the north, and with no fences separating the two, the terrain of the 2 500 sq kms reserve combines most types of Kalahari habitat – rolling grasslands, river beds, fossil dunes and grassed and bare pans.

The reserve is part of an ancient river system that once flowed northeast to fill the prehistoric Lake Makgadikgadi. Khutse’s Pans and dry river valleys are remnants of this river system.

Officially declared a protected area in 1971, Khutse (meaning ‘place where you can kneel down and drink’) was the second game reserve in Botswana to be established on tribal land (Moremi game Reserve in the Okavango was the first).

There is a series of rather picturesque pans (signposted) where wildlife often congregate, particularly during and following good rains; and indeed game drives are focused around the pans. These include the Motailane, Moreswa and Molose pans. Sometimes water is pumped at artificial waterholes at Moreswa and Molose, making for good game viewing year round.

Animals commonly sighted include springbok (often in abundance), gemsbok (often common), giraffe, wildebeest, hartebeest, kudu, black-backed jackal, steenbok, duiker, and the accompanying predators lion, leopard, cheetah, smaller cats, and the endangered brown hyena.

There are several delightful loops worth driving through the reserve. The shorter drive is the northern loop around Sekhushwe and Mohurusile pans, approximately 24 kms from the reserve headquarters. The longer drive is to Moreswa Pan, about 64 kms from the headquarters, or a 120 kms loop.

The San and Bakgalagadi peoples – the Kgalagadi’s original inhabitants – live in small villages on the periphery of the reserve. Their traditional arts and crafts can usually be purchased here; and walks with the San can be arranged at the Khutse Kalahari Lodge, about 10 kms before the reserve entrance.

(Source Botswana Tourism)

 

 

 

Central Kalahari Game Reserve

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©BTO

 

Nothing prepares you for the immensity of this reserve, nor its wild, mysterious beauty. There is the immediate impression of unending space, and having the entire reserve to yourself.

Waist-high golden grasses seem to stretch interminably, punctuated by dwarfed trees and scrub bushes. Wide and empty pans appear as vast white stretches of saucer-flat earth, meeting a soft, blue-white sky. At night the stars utterly dominate the land; their brilliance and immediacy are totally arresting.

The Central Kalahari game Reserve (CKGR) is the largest, most remotely situated reserve in Southern Africa, and the second largest wildlife reserve in the world, encompassing 52 800 sq kms.

During and shortly after good summer rains, the flat grasslands of the reserve’s northern reaches teem with wildlife, which gather at the best grazing areas. These include large herds of springbok and gemsbok, as well as wildebeest, hartebeest, eland and giraffe.

At other times of the year, when the animals are more sparsely distributed, the experience of travelling through truly untouched wilderness, of seemingly unending dimensions, is the draw.

The landscape is dominated by silver terminalia sandveldt, Kalahari sand acacias, and Kalahari appleleaf, interspersed with grasslands, and dotted with occasional sand dunes, pans and shallow fossil river valleys.

CKGR is unique in that it was originally established (in 1961) with the intention of serving as a place of sanctuary for the San, in the heart of the Kalahari (and Botswana), where they could live their traditional hunter/ gatherer way of life, without intrusion, or influence, from the outside world.

The reserve was closed for about 30 years, until in the 1980s and 1990s, both self-drive and organised tours were allowed in, albeit in small, tightly controlled numbers.

The Botswana government has initiated plans to develop tourism away from the Okavango and Chobe areas, and has allocated concessions for lodge construction, both at the peripheries of and inside the reserve, allowing for fly-in tourists.

The northern deception valley is one of the highlights, principally because of the dense concentrations of herbivores its sweet grasses attract during and after the rainy season (and of course the accompanying predators). It is also the most travelled area of the reserve, with a number of public campsites, and proximity to the eastern Matswere Gate. The other two gates are completely at the other side of the reserve, at Xade and Tsau, where public campsites are also available.

Other worthwhile areas to drive are Sunday and Leopard Pans, north of Deception Valley, Passarge Valley,and, further south, Piper’s Pan.

(Source Botswana Tourism)

 

 

 

Khama Rhino Sanctuary

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Affording the opportunity to see both black and white rhino – as well as an abundance of other wildlife species – the Khama Rhino Sanctuary (KRS) is a delightful stopover for tourists travelling by road to Botswana’s northern reserves, or an ideal weekend getaway for Gaborone or Francistown visitors or residents.

A mere 20 kms from the historically important village of Serowe, the accessibility of KRS is also a draw. This community tourism project, managed and staffed by local village residents, offers game drives, birding, bush walks, and arts and crafts shopping. It also has an education centre where many young children from all over Botswana come for environmental education, as well as a fun time in the bush.

KRS was established in 1989 due to growing concern over the then escalating rhino poaching situation in Botswana. Both black and white rhino – once abundant in Botswana – were during the early 1980s on the brink of local extinction, despite their having been granted protected status as far back as 1922.

Led by the Bangwato paramount Chief, the then Lt. Gen. Seretse Khama Ian Khama, and other conservationists, the people of Serowe conceived the idea to form a sanctuary to protect the remaining rhinos in Botswana, and hopefully give them safe haven to reproduce and gain numbers.

The first four white rhinos were reintroduced into the sanctuary from the Chobe National Park in 1992. Eight more rhinos came from the North West National Parks in South Africa.

The highly endangered black rhino was re-introduced in 2002.

The gamble paid off , and both species are doing well, under the watchful eye of sanctuary staff as well as the Botswana Defence Force (BDF), who assist with the constant patrolling of the sanctuary’s borders.

To date, KRS has 35 white rhino, and is serving as a source for their re-introduction back to the Moremi Game Reserve, the Makgadikgadi, the Northern Tuli Game Reserve, and elsewhere. And – much to the credit of KRS staff – the male and female black rhinos have mated, and the sanctuary’s first baby black rhino was born in 2008!

(Source Botswana Tourism)

 

 

 

Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park

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History was made when Botswana and a newly liberated, democratic South Africa signed in 1999 a treaty to form the first transfrontier peace park in Africa.

Plans to formalise the joint management and development of South Africa’s Kalahari Gemsbok National Park and Botswana’s Gemsbok National Park were proposed as early as 1989, but no such partnership was possible during South Africa’s dark years of apartheid. Following South africa’s independence in 1994, and with the support and encouragement of the Peace Parks Foundation, negotiations concretised; and in May 2002, the park was officially opened.

This immense wilderness (37 000 sq kms) is now shared by both countries as a protected area, and is jointly managed. The entire park is completely unfenced, allowing for wildlife to move freely along the ancient migration routes so necessary for their survival in the desert.

Situated in the extreme southwest corner of Botswana, and adjacent to South Africa’s Northern Cape Province, the Kgalagadi Transfrontier park (KTP) is run as a single ecological unit, and gate receipts are shared. Tourist facilities, however, are still run autonomously.

Immigration and customs facilities have been designed to allow travellers to enter the park in one country and depart in the other. The main entry and departure point between the two countries is at the Two Rivers/ Twee Rivieren gate, which also has camping facilities, chalets, shops and a restaurant.

The national boundary with South Africa is along the dry Nossop River bed; and three quarters of the park lies within Botswana territory. Currently, KTP is mainly visited by self-drive campers, with a few operators offering mobile tours.

At the time of going to print, the Botswana government had allocated five fixed lodge sites for development by the private sector.

There are three main areas to explore: the Nossop River valley, along the South Africa/Botswana border, the wilderness trails on the Botswana side, and what was once the Mabuasehube Game Reserve, now incorporated into KTP at its most northeastern reaches.

To maintain KTP’s pure wilderness experience, there are strict limits as to the number of vehicles that can travel the wilderness trails, how many nights a camping party can stay at a campsite (usually limited to one night), and how many people can camp at each campsite. Hence booking well in advance is essential.

Self-drive campers must comprise at least two vehicles; well-equipped 4x4s are required for the rough, sandy roads.

KTP’s very beautiful terrain comprises fossil river valleys dotted with dwarfed trees and bushes, grasslands and different coloured sand dunes. Wildlife is abundant, and the animals are attracted to waterholes along the otherwise dry riverbed.

Several species of antelope, including the ubiquitous springbok and gemsbok, hartebeest, and eland can be seen, as well as the famous black-maned Kalahari lion, jackal, brown hyena, and wild cats.

Rich birding is always part of the experience. Over 170 species of birds have been recorded here, and it is not uncommon to see over 30 bird species within a few kilometres of the campsite.

At Mabuasehube, the terrain is a mixture of typical Kgalagadi tree and shrub savanna with patches of wide open grass savanna.

This area of KTP comprises a series of exceptionally large pans, which are the principle focus of the reserve. Campsites dot the various pans, and many are situated on slight promontories, giving almost unimpeded vision, thus making for good game viewing right from your camp-side chair.

Three of the largest pans lie along the main road; these are Bosobogolo, Mpayathutlwa and Mabuasehube. others, like Leshologago, Khiding and the fossil valley complex called Monamodi, are linked to the larger pans by sand tracks.

Each pan is different. The floor of Mabuasehube pan is bare clay that is rich in salts, and this attracts animals that come to lick the surface, deriving essential minerals from it. The floor of Bosobogolo pan is short, shrubby grassland, which antelope frequent to graze, accompanied, of course, by predators.

All of the major predators can be seen at Mabuasehube, including the Kalahari black-maned lion, cheetah, leopard, brown hyena, bat-eared fox, lynx, and silver fox. Small mammals, like the Cape fox, aardwolf and blackfooted cat can be seen at the pans in the evening.

(Source Botswana Tourism)

 

Chobe National Park

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Whether arriving by air or road, the first glimpse of the river – deep and dazzling in the sandy terrain – is always breathtaking. It appears as a swathe of brilliant, peacock blue ribbon, winding its way through the tiny town of Kasane, and ensuing wilderness – the Chobe National Park.

Undoubtedly one of Africa’s most beautiful rivers, the Chobe supports a diversity and concentration of wildlife unparalled anywhere else in the country.

Established in 1968, the park covers approximately 11 7 00 sq kms, encompassing floodplains, swamps and woodland. The Chobe River forms its northern boundary. There are four distinct geographical areas in the park: the Chobe Riverfront, the Ngwezumba pans, Savuté and Linyanti.

The most accessible and frequently visited of Botswana’s big game country, the Chobe Riverfront is most famous for its large herds of elephants and cape Buffalo, which during the dry winter months converge upon the river to drink.

During this season, on an afternoon game drive, you may see hundreds of elephants at one time. You may be surrounded by elephants, as the main Serondella road becomes impassable and scores of family herds cross the main road to make their way to the river to drink, bathe and play.

Driving the loops that hug the river’s edge, you may see up to 15 different species of animals on any one game drive, including waterbuck, lechwe, puku (this is the only part of Botswana where they can be seen), giraffe, kudu, roan and sable, impala, warthog, bushbuck, monkeys and baboons, along with the accompanying predators lion, leopard, hyena and jackal.

Take a river cruise – and you’ll experience the park, and the animals, from another vantage point. Here you’ll get up close and personal with hippo, crocodile and a mind-boggling array of water birds.

Over 460 bird species have been recorded in the park, making it one of Africa’s premier venues for bird Safaris. Common species to be seen include the Sacred ibis, Egyptian Geese, the ubiquitous cormorants and darters, Spur-winged Geese, pel’s Fishing Owl, carmine Bee-eaters, most members of the kingfisher family, all the rollers, the unmistakable Fish Eagle, the Martial Eagle, and many members of the stork family.

The Chobe River rises in the northern Angolan highlands, travels enormous distances before it reaches Botswana at Ngoma. Like the Okavango and Zambezi rivers, the Chobe’s course is affected by fault lines that are extensions of the Great Rift Valley. These three mighty rivers carry more water than all other rivers in Southern Africa.

Lesoma Memorial Monument

In 1977, the brutal civil war in the then Rhodesia spilled over into Botswana. In the process, 15 Botswana Defence Force soldiers died; however, the incident only strengthened Botswana’s national resolve to remain a peace loving nation.

Ngwenzumba Pans

The Ngwezumba pans lie approximately 70 kms south of the Chobe River and comprise a large complex of clay pans, surrounded by mophane woodlands and grassland plains.

During the rainy season, the pans fill with water, then attracting wildlife that move away from the permanent water sources of the Linyanti and Chobe Rivers.

Savute

Truly at the interior of the park, Savuté boasts most of the chobe species, except for water-loving antelope. It is best known for its predators,particularly lion, cheetah and hyena, of which there are large resident populations.

The Savuté channel flows from the Linyanti River for about 100 kilometres, carrying water away from the river and releasing it into a vast swampland called the Savuté Marsh, and further south onto the Mababe Depression, which is also fed by the Ngwezumba River from the northeast. The Mababe – immense and flat and fringed by thickets of trees – was once part of the Makgadikgadi super-lake. When filled with water, it becomes the venue for thousands of migratory birds and animals, particularly large herds of zebra.

Geographically, Savuté is an area of many curiosities. One of its greatest mysteries is the Savuté channel itself, which has over the past 100 year inexplicably dried up and recommenced its flow several times. This irregular water flow explains the numerous dead trees that line the channel, for they have germinated and grown when the channel was dry and drowned when the channel flowed again.

(Source Botswana Tourism)

 

 

 

Tsodilo Hills – UNESCO World Heritage Site

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Rising abruptly, and dramatically, from the Kalahari scrub bush – the rock face turning a copper colour in the dying sun – the magnetic power of Tsodilo Hills both captivates and mystifies. There is an undeniable spiritualism about the Hills that immediately strikes the visitor.

Indeed for the people who live at the Hills – the San, the original inhabitants, and the Hambukushu who have periodically occupied the hills for the past 200 years – Tsodilo is a sacred, mystical place where ancestral spirits dwell. In earlier times, their ancestors performed religious rituals to ask for assistance, and for rain. They also put paintings on the rock face; and their meaning and symbolism remain a mystery even to today.

Exploring the three main Hills – Male, Female, and child – is a journey into antiquity. Archaeological research – ongoing for the past 30 years – estimates that Tsodilo has been inhabited for the past 100 000 years, making this one of the world’s oldest historical sites. Pottery, iron, glass beads, shell beads, carved bone and stone tools date back 90 000 years.

The Early iron Age Site at Tsodilo, called Divuyu, dates between 700- 900AD, and reveals that Bantu people have been living at the hills for over 1000 years, probably having come from central Africa. They were cattle farmers, settled on the plateau, and traded copper jewellery from the Congo, seashells from the Atlantic, and glass beads from Asia, probably in exchange for specularite and furs. There was a great deal of interaction between different groups, and trade networks were extensive.

Excavations also reveal over 20 mines that extracted specularite – a glittery iron-oxide derivative that was used in early times as a cosmetic.

Rock paintings are nearly everywhere – representing thousands of years of human inhabitation, and are amongst the region’s finest, and most important. There are approximately 4 000 in all, comprising red finger paintings and geometrics. It is almost certain that most paintings were done by the San, and some were painted by the pastoral Khoe who later settled in the area. The red paintings were done mainly in the first millennium AD.

Two of the most famous images are the rhino polychromes and the Eland panel, the latter situated on a soaring cliff that overlooks the African wilderness. Indeed the inaccessibility of many of the paintings may be linked to their religious significance.

The fact that Tsodilo is totally removed from all other rock art sites in Southern Africa adds to its aura of magic. The nearest known site is 250 kilometres away. What’s more, the paintings at Tsodilo are generally unlike others in the southern African region – in both style and incidence of certain images. Many are isolated figures and over half depict wild and domestic animals. In fact, there is a higher incidence of domestic animals than at other sites in Southern Africa. Some are scenes, but few seem to tell a story. Many are outlined schematic designs and geometrical patterns.

There are walking trails – the Rhino Trail, Lion Trail and cliff Trail, and others; and it is recommended that you take a guide to walk the trails and see the paintings. Both San and Hambukushu live near the hills, and guides from their villages can be easily arranged.

There is a small museum at the entrance to the site; the main campsite at Museum Headquarter has ablutions and water, while the three other smaller campsites have no facilities. Because of its tremendous historical and cultural importance, Tsodilo was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2002.

(Source Botswana Tourism

 

 

 

Moremi Game Reserve

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This gem of a National Park has garnered a number of important distinctions. in 2008, it was voted the ‘best game reserve in Africa’ by the prestigious African Travel and Tourism Association at South Africa’s premier tourism fair, Indaba.

It is the first reserve in Africa that was established by local residents. Concerned about the rapid depletion of wildlife in their ancestral lands – due to uncontrolled hunting and cattle encroachment – the Batawana people of Ngamiland, under the leadership of the deceased Chief Moremi III’s wife, Mrs. Moremi, took the bold initiative to proclaim Moremi a game reserve in 1963.

It is the only officially protected area of the Okavango Delta, and as such holds tremendous scientific, environmental and conservation importance.

And, undoubtedly, Moremi ranks as one of the most beautiful reserves in Africa, possibly in the world.

 

[wds id=”8″]
Moremi – Game viewing at its finest!
(Source Botswana Tourism
Moremi Game Reserve is situated in the central and eastern areas of the Okavango, and includes the Moremi Tongue and chief’s island, boasting one of the richest and most diverse ecosystems on the continent.

This makes for spectacular game viewing and bird watching, including all major naturally occurring herbivore and carnivore species in the region, and over 400 species of birds, many migratory and some endangered. Both Black and White Rhino have recently been re-introduced, now making the reserve a ‘Big Five’ destination.

Contained within an area of approximately 3900 sq kms, here land and Delta meet to create an exceedingly picturesque preserve of floodplains – either seasonally or perennially wet, waterways, lagoons, pools, pans, grasslands and riparian, riverine and mophane forests. This terrain makes driving Moremi’s many loops and trails both delightful and, at times, totally inspiring.

Moremi is a very popular destination for the self-drive camper, and is often combined with the Chobe National Park to the northeast.

The rustic Third Bridge campsite, situated near the pretty Sekiri River, flanked with thick stands of papyrus, is a favourite, creating lasting memories of resplendent Okavango sunsets.

(Source Botswana Tourism
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Geography
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The coastline has a length of 2,300 km. Some 40 miles (64 km) north of the South African frontier is the deep indentation of Delagoa Bay.

In the north the Zambezi Riverdelta empties into the Indian Ocean. North from this point the coast is blessed with small coral islands,. To the north the coast is much indented, with rocky headlands and cliffs while there is an almost continuous fringe of islands.

In southern Mozambique the coastline is low, sandy and contains mangrove swamps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Health
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Botswana’s HIV infection rate, estimated at 24.1%, is the 2nd highest reported in the world. Exercise regular universal precautions when dealing with any bodily fluid and   remain aware of this high rate of infection. Take precautions accordingly. Wear rubber gloves when dressing someone else’s cut, even if they are a child.

The northern part of Botswana, including Chobe National Park and the Okavango Delta is in a malaria zone, so it is advisable to take the relevant precautions.

Seek medical  advice before travelling to these areas.

Water in urban areas is chlorinated, and is drunk from the tap by the local population. Still, short term visitors with sensitive stomachs may feel more secure drinking bottled water. Outside of urban areas, the water is untreated and straight from the borehole and poses a slightly higher risk to the traveller.

 

 

 

Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor (ideally, 4-6 weeks) before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need.

 

  Find Out Why Protect Yourself
All travellers

You should be up to date on routine vaccinations while traveling to any destination. Some vaccines may also be required for travel.

Routine vaccines(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/routine) Make sure you are up-to-date on routine vaccines before every trip. These vaccines include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine, varicella (chickenpox) vaccine, polio vaccine, and your yearly flu shot.
Most travellers

Get travel vaccines and medicines because there is a risk of these diseases in the country you are visiting.

Hepatitis A(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/hepatitis-a) CDC recommends this vaccine because you can get hepatitis A through contaminated food or water in Mozambique, regardless of where you are eating or staying.
Malaria(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/malaria) You will need to take prescription medicine before, during, and after your trip to prevent malaria. Your doctor can help you decide which medicine is right for you, and also talk to you about other steps you can take to prevent malaria. See more detailed information about malaria in Mozambique(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2016/infectious-diseases-related-to-travel/yellow-fever-malaria-information-by-country/mozambique#seldyfm879).
Typhoid(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/typhoid) You can get typhoid through contaminated food or water in Mozambique. CDC recommends this vaccine for most travelers, especially if you are staying with friends or relatives, visiting smaller cities or rural areas, or if you are an adventurous eater.
Some travellers

Ask your doctor what vaccines and medicines you need based on where you are going, how long you are staying, what you will be doing, and if you are traveling from a country other than the US.

Cholera(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/cholera) CDC recommends this vaccine for adults who are traveling to areas of active cholera transmission. Areas of active cholera transmission include the provinces of Nampula, Tete (last case reported May 2017), and Maputo (last case reported May 2017) of Mozambique. Cholera is rare in travelers but can be severe. Certain factors may increase the risk of getting cholera or having severe disease (more information(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/cholera)). Avoiding unsafe food and water and washing your hands can also prevent cholera.
Hepatitis B(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/hepatitis-b) You can get hepatitis B through sexual contact, contaminated needles, and blood products, so CDC recommends this vaccine if you might have sex with a new partner, get a tattoo or piercing, or have any medical procedures.
Rabies(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/rabies) Rabies can be found in dogs, bats, and other mammals in Mozambique, so CDC recommends this vaccine for the following groups:

·         Travelers involved in outdoor and other activities (such as camping, hiking, biking, adventure travel, and caving) that put them at risk for animal bites.

·         People who will be working with or around animals (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, and researchers).

·         People who are taking long trips or moving to Mozambique

·         Children, because they tend to play with animals, might not report bites, and are more likely to have animal bites on their head and neck.

Yellow Fever(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/yellow-fever) There is no risk of yellow fever in Mozambique. The government of Mozambique requires proof of yellow fever vaccination only if you are arriving from a country with risk of yellow fever. This does not include the US. If you are traveling from a country other than the US, check this list to see if you may be required to get the yellow fever vaccine: Countries with risk of yellow fever virus (YFV) transmission(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2018/infectious-diseases-related-to-travel/yellow-fever#5291).

For more information on recommendations and requirements, see yellow fever recommendations and requirements for Mozambique(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2018/infectious-diseases-related-to-travel/yellow-fever-malaria-information-by-country/mozambique#seldyfm879). Your doctor can help you decide if this vaccine is right for you based on your travel plans.

All travellers

You should be up to date on routine vaccinations while traveling to any destination. Some vaccines may also be required for travel.

Routine vaccines(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/routine)

Make sure you are up-to-date on routine vaccines before every trip. These vaccines include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine, varicella (chickenpox) vaccine, polio vaccine, and your yearly flu shot.

Most travellers

Get travel vaccines and medicines because there is a risk of these diseases in the country you are visiting.

Hepatitis A(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/hepatitis-a)

CDC recommends this vaccine because you can get hepatitis A through contaminated food or water in Mozambique, regardless of where you are eating or staying.

Malaria(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/malaria)

You will need to take prescription medicine before, during, and after your trip to prevent malaria. Your doctor can help you decide which medicine is right for you, and also talk to you about other steps you can take to prevent malaria. See more detailed information about malaria in Mozambique(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2016/infectious-diseases-related-to-travel/yellow-fever-malaria-information-by-country/mozambique#seldyfm879).

Typhoid(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/typhoid)

You can get typhoid through contaminated food or water in Mozambique. CDC recommends this vaccine for most travelers, especially if you are staying with friends or relatives, visiting smaller cities or rural areas, or if you are an adventurous eater.

Some travellers

Ask your doctor what vaccines and medicines you need based on where you are going, how long you are staying, what you will be doing, and if you are traveling from a country other than the US.

Cholera(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/cholera)

CDC recommends this vaccine for adults who are traveling to areas of active cholera transmission. Areas of active cholera transmission include the provinces of Nampula, Tete (last case reported May 2017), and Maputo (last case reported May 2017) of Mozambique. Cholera is rare in travelers but can be severe. Certain factors may increase the risk of getting cholera or having severe disease (more information(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/cholera)). Avoiding unsafe food and water and washing your hands can also prevent cholera.

Hepatitis B(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/hepatitis-b)

You can get hepatitis B through sexual contact, contaminated needles, and blood products, so CDC recommends this vaccine if you might have sex with a new partner, get a tattoo or piercing, or have any medical procedures.

Rabies(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/rabies)

Rabies can be found in dogs, bats, and other mammals in Mozambique, so CDC recommends this vaccine for the following groups:

  • Travelers involved in outdoor and other activities (such as camping, hiking, biking, adventure travel, and caving) that put them at risk for animal bites.
  • People who will be working with or around animals (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, and researchers).
  • People who are taking long trips or moving to Mozambique
  • Children, because they tend to play with animals, might not report bites, and are more likely to have animal bites on their head and neck.
  • Yellow Fever(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/yellow-fever)

There is no risk of yellow fever in Mozambique. The government of Mozambique requires proof of yellow fever vaccination only if you are arriving from a country with risk of yellow fever. This does not include the US. If you are traveling from a country other than the US, check this list to see if you may be required to get the yellow fever vaccine: Countries with risk of yellow fever virus (YFV) transmission(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2018/infectious-diseases-related-to-travel/yellow-fever#5291).

For more information on recommendations and requirements, see yellow fever recommendations and requirements for Mozambique(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2018/infectious-diseases-related-to-travel/yellow-fever-malaria-information-by-country/mozambique#seldyfm879). Your doctor can help you decide if this vaccine is right for you based on your travel plans.

Key

  • Get vaccinated
  • Take antimalarial meds
  • Eat and drink safely
  • Prevent bug bites
  • Keep away from animals
  • Reduce your exposure to germs
  • Avoid sharing body fluids
  • Avoid non-sterile medical or cosmetic equipment
  • Stay Healthy and Safe

Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Mozambique, so your behaviour is important.

(Source CDC

 

Eat and drink safely

Unclean food and water can cause travellers’ diarrhoea and other diseases. Reduce your risk by sticking to safe food and water habits.

Eat

  • Food that is cooked and served hot
  • Hard-cooked eggs
  • Fruits and vegetables you have washed in clean water or peeled yourself
  • Pasteurized dairy products

Don’t Eat

  • Food served at room temperature
  • Food from street vendors
  • Raw or soft-cooked (runny) eggs
  • Raw or undercooked (rare) meat or fish
  • Unwashed or unpeeled raw fruits and vegetables
  • Unpasteurized dairy products
  • ”Bushmeat” (monkeys, bats, or other wild game)

Drink

  • Bottled water that is sealed
  • Water that has been disinfected
  • Ice made with bottled or disinfected water
  • Carbonated drinks
  • Hot coffee or tea
  • Pasteurized milk

Don’t Drink

  • Tap or well water
  • Ice made with tap or well water
  • Drinks made with tap or well water (such as reconstituted juice)
  • Unpasteurized milk

Take Medicine

Talk with your doctor about taking prescription or over-the-counter drugs with you on your trip in case you get sick.

 

 

(Source CDC

Prevent bug bites

Bugs (like mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas) can spread a number of diseases in Mozambique. Many of these diseases cannot be prevented with a vaccine or medicine. You can reduce your risk by taking steps to prevent bug bites.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Stay and sleep in air-conditioned or screened rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.
  • What type of insect repellent should I use?
  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or more DEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST MOSQUITOES ONLY: Products with one of the following active ingredients can also help prevent mosquito bites. Higher percentages of active ingredient provide longer protection.
    • DEET
    • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
    • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or PMD
    • IR3535
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.
  • What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?
  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.
  • What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/avoid-bug-bites) for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs.

For more detailed information on avoiding bug bites, see Avoid Bug Bites(https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/avoid-bug-bites).

Stay safe outdoors

If your travel plans in Mozambique include outdoor activities, take these steps to stay safe and healthy during your trip.

  • Stay alert to changing weather conditions and adjust your plans if conditions become unsafe.
  • Prepare for activities by wearing the right clothes and packing protective items, such as bug spray, sunscreen, and a basic first aid kit.
  • Consider learning basic first aid and CPR before travel. Bring a travel health kit with items appropriate for your activities.
  • Heat-related illness, such as heat stroke, can be deadly. Eat and drink regularly, wear loose and lightweight clothing, and limit physical activity during high temperatures.
    • If you are outside for many hours in heat, eat salty snacks and drink water to stay hydrated and replace salt lost through sweating.
  • Protect yourself from UV radiation: use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, wear protective clothing, and seek shade during the hottest time of day (10 a.m.–4 p.m.).
  • Be especially careful during summer months and at high elevation. Because sunlight reflects off snow, sand, and water, sun exposure may be increased during activities like skiing, swimming, and sailing.
  • Very cold temperatures can be dangerous. Dress in layers and cover heads, hands, and feet properly if you are visiting a cold location.
  • Stay safe around water
  • Swim only in designated swimming areas. Obey lifeguards and warning flags on beaches.
  • Practice safe boating—follow all boating safety laws, do not drink alcohol if driving a boat, and always wear a life jacket.
  • Do not dive into shallow water.
  • Do not swim in freshwater in developing areas or where sanitation is poor.
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming. Untreated water can carry germs that make you sick.
  • To prevent infections, wear shoes on beaches where there may be animal waste.

Schistosomiasis, a parasitic infection that can be spread in fresh water, is found in Mozambique. Avoid swimming in fresh, unchlorinated water, such as lakes, ponds, or rivers.

 

Keep away from animals

Most animals avoid people, but they may attack if they feel threatened, are protecting their young or territory, or if they are injured or ill. Animal bites and scratches can lead to serious diseases such as rabies.

Follow these tips to protect yourself:

  • Do not touch or feed any animals you do not know.
  • Do not allow animals to lick open wounds, and do not get animal saliva in your eyes or mouth.
  • Avoid rodents and their urine and faeces.
  • Traveling pets should be supervised closely and not allowed to come in contact with local animals.
  • If you wake in a room with a bat, seek medical care immediately. Bat bites may be hard to see.

All animals can pose a threat, but be extra careful around dogs, bats, monkeys, sea animals such as jellyfish, and snakes. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, immediately:

  • Wash the wound with soap and clean water.
  • Go to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor about your injury when you get back to the United States.

Consider buying medical evacuation insurance. Rabies is a deadly disease that must be treated quickly, and treatment may not be available in some countries.

 

 

Reduce your exposure to germs

Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.Hide
  • Avoid sharing body fluids
  • Hide

Diseases can be spread through body fluids, such as saliva, blood, vomit, and semen.

Protect yourself:

  • Use latex condoms correctly.
  • Do not inject drugs.
  • Limit alcohol consumption. People take more risks when intoxicated.
  • Do not share needles or any devices that can break the skin. That includes needles for tattoos, piercings, and acupuncture.
  • If you receive medical or dental care, make sure the equipment is disinfected or sanitized.Hide
  • Know how to get medical care while traveling
  • Hide

Plan for how you will get health care during your trip, should the need arise:

  • Carry a list of local doctors and hospitals at your destination.
  • Review your health insurance plan to determine what medical services it would cover during your trip. Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance.
  • Carry a card that identifies, in the local language, your blood type, chronic conditions or serious allergies, and the generic names of any medications you take.
  • Some prescription drugs may be illegal in other countries. Call Mozambique’s embassy to verify that all of your prescription(s) are legal to bring with you.
  • Bring all the medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) you think you might need during your trip, including extra in case of travel delays. Ask your doctor to help you get prescriptions filled early if you need to.

Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website (www.jointcommissioninternational.org).

In some countries, medicine (prescription and over-the-counter) may be substandard or counterfeit. Bring the medicines you will need from the United States to avoid having to buy them at your destination.

Malaria is a risk in Mozambique. Fill your malaria prescription before you leave and take enough with you for the entire length of your trip. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking the pills; some need to be started before you leave.

 

(Source CDC

 

 

 

 

History, Language and Culture
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Officially Portuguese is the official language. In addition over 60 different African languages can be found in Mozambique. English is generally spoken in beach lodges and larger hotels.

 

 

Arts & Culture

Arms into Art
A virtual exhibition in cooperation with the artists’ collective Nucleo de Arte. In workshops, members made works of art out of AK 47 machine guns, landmines and hand weapons.

Centre Culturel Franco Mozambicain de Maputo
Arts and culture of Mozambique provided by the French Mozambican Culture Center Maputo (in French and Portuguese).

Fotografia Moçambicana
The Platform of Mozambican Photographers with a photo exhibition about Mozambiquen photography from 1950 to 2001.

The World Through My Eyes
A project that helps Mozambican children learn about and experiment with photography, improving their chances of receiving scholarships at a university either in Mozambique or abroad.

Zambézia Online
Community site of the province of Zambézia.

Music
Ghorwane
Mozambican Band, the Good Guys music of Mozambique.

Must see in Mozambique
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Why Visit Mozambique ?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Road Travel in Mozambique
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STILL TO DO !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Travel Advisories and Warnings
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Mozambique, more than most Southern African nations is subject to rapid change in respect of safety and security. Please check with locals as well as the following websites just before taking any specific route. An area that was a “No Go” a month ago might now be safe and vise versa. Read the following US Advisory but bear in mind that it may not be current.

 

“Violent conflict between government forces and armed elements of the major opposition party rose dramatically in 2016, mostly in the four central provinces (Sofala, Manica, Tete, Zambezia) but with occasional reports of conflict in Niassa, Nampula, and Inhambane provinces. Attacks on civilian vehicles, military convoys, and commercial railway transportation as well as politically-motivated assassinations, kidnappings, and escort convoys for highway traffic occurred in these provinces. The U.S. Embassy and many other Western missions in Maputo restricted travel to several provinces during most of 2016. A cease-fire was announced in late December 2016, extended in January 2017 for 60 days, and (as of March 2017) is still in effect. The cease-fire is an important development in negotiations between the government and opposition elements, but only time will tell if the cease-fire evolves into a longer-term pause in the violence and if acceptable terms will be agreed to by both sides.”

Source https://www.osac.gov/pages/ContentReportDetails

Emergency Numbers

STILL NEED !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 


Useful Phrases
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© Simon Ager Omniglot       www.omniglot.com

Useful Portuguese phrases

A collection of useful phrases in European Portuguese, the type of Portuguese spoken in Portugal. Phrases in Brazilian Portuguese are also available.

Key to abbreviations: sg = singular (said to one person), pl = plural (said to more than one person, (v)inf = (very) informal, frm = formal, m = male (said by males), f = female (said by females), >m = said to males, >f said to females, arch = archaic

English português (Portuguese)
Welcome Bem-vindo (>m)
Bem-vinda (>f)
Bem-vindos (pl)
Hello (General greeting) Olá
Hello (on phone) Está lá?
Estou sim?
Estou?
Hâlo
How are you? Como está? (frm)
Como vai? (inf)
Tudo bem? (inf)
Como estamos? (vinf)
Reply to ‘How are you?’ Estou bem, obrigado(a). E o senhor? (frm)
Estou bem, obrigado(a). E o senhora? (frm)
Estou bem, obrigado(a). E o você? (frm)
Bem, obrigado. E você? (inf)
Bem, obrigado. E vocês? (inf)
Está tudo, obrigado. E com você? (inf)
Long time no see Nossa!Quanto tempo!
What’s your name? Como se chama? (frm)
Como te chamas? (inf)
My name is … Chamo-me …
Eu chamo-me …
Where are you from? É de onde? (frm)
És de onde?
De onde és? (inf)
I’m from … Venho de …
Sou de …
Pleased to meet you Prazer
Prazer em conhecê-lo (>m)
Prazer em conhecê-la (>f)
Prazer em conhecê-los (>m/>mf)
Prazer em conhecê-las (>ff)
Encantado (m)
Encantada (f)
Good morning
(Morning greeting)
Bom dia
Good afternoon
(Afternoon greeting)
/evening
Boa tarde
Good night Boa noite
Goodbye
(Parting phrases)
Adeus (frm)
Tchau (inf)
Até logo! (see you)
Até breve (see you soon)
Tem cuidado (take care)
Good luck! Boa sorte!
Cheers! Good Health!
(Toasts used when drinking)
Viva!
Saúde! (health)
Tchim-tchim!
Have a nice day Tem um bom dia!
Bon appetit /
Have a nice meal
Bom apetite!
Bon voyage /
Have a good journey
Boa viagem!
I don’t know Não sei
Do you understand? Percebe?
I understand Compreendo
Percebo
I don’t understand Não compreendo
Não percebo
Please speak more slowly Fale mais devagar
Please say that again Pode repetir isso, por favor?
Please write it down O senhor poderia escrever isso para mim, por favor (frm>m)
A senhora poderia escrever isso para mim, por favor (frm>f)
Pode escrever isso para mim, por favor? (inf)
Do you speak English? Você fala inglês? (frm)
Fala inglês? (frm)
Falas inglês? (inf)
Do you speak Portuguese? Você fala português? (frm)
Fala português? (frm)
Falas português? (inf)
Yes, a little
(reply to ‘Do you speak …?’)
Sim, um pouco
Speak to me in Portuguese Fale comigo em português
How do you say … in Portuguese? Como se diz … em português?
Como é que se diz … em português?
Excuse me Com licença!
Desculpe!
Perdão! (frm)
Desculpa (inf)
How much is this? Quanto custa?
Quanto custa isto? (inf)
Qual o preço? (frm)
Qual o preço disto? (frm)
Sorry Desculpe! (frm)
Desculpa! (inf)
Please Por favor
Faz favor
Thank you Obrigado (m)
Obrigada (f)
Muito obrigado (m)
Muito obrigada (f)
Obrigadinho (m)
Obrigadinha (f)
Muito agradecido (m)
Muito agradecida (f)
Muito agradecidos (pl)
More details about saying thank you in Portuguese
Reply to thank you Você é bem-vindo
Where’s the toilet? Onde está o WC?
Onde está a casa de banho?
Onde estão as casas de banho? (inf)
Onde estão os lavabos?
This gentleman will pay for everything Este senhor vai pagar tudo
This lady will pay for everything Esta senhora vai pagar tudo
Would you like to dance with me? Você quer dançar? (frm)
Quer dançar comigo? (frm)
Queres dançar comigo? (inf)
Gostaria de dançar? (frm)
Do you come here often? Você vem sempre aqui? (frm)
Vens Tu aquia amiúde?
I miss you Tenho saudades tuas
Sinto a tua falta
Eu sinto saudade de você
I love you Amo-o (frm>m)
Amo-a (frm>f)
Adoro-te (inf)
Adoro-o (frm>m)
Adoro-a (frm>f)
Get well soon Que melhore logo!
As melhoras breves! (frm)
As melhoras!
Que melhores logo! (inf)
Que melhorem logo!
Que melhoreis logo! (arch)
Go away! Suma-se!
Vai-se embora!
Leave me alone! Deixe-me em paz! (frm)
Deixa-me em paz! (inf)
Help! Ajuda! (inf/s)
Ajudem! (inf/pl)
Socorro!
Fire! Fogo!
Stop! Pare! (frm)
Pára! (inf)
Parem! (pl)
Call the police! Chame a polícia!
Chama a polícia! (inf)
Chamem a polícia! (pl)
Christmas and New Year greetings Feliz Natal e Bom Ano Novo
Boas Festas e Feliz Ano Novo
Feliz Natal e Feliz Ano Novo
Easter greetings Boa Páscoa
Páscoa Feliz
Birthday greetings Parabéns!
Feliz aniversário!
One language is never enough Uma só língua nunca basta
My hovercraft is full of eels
Why this phrase?
O meu hovercraft está cheio de enguias

If you would like to make any corrections or additions to this page, or if you can provide recordings, please contact me.

A collection of useful phrases in Chichewa, a Bantu language spoken in Malawi, Zambia, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. The language is known as Chewa (chicheŵa) in Malawi, and Nyanja (chinyanja) in Zambia and Mozambique.

Phrase chicheŵa (Chichewa)
Welcome Zikomo
Hello (General greeting) Moni
Moni onse (hello all of you)
Hello (on phone)
How are you? Muli bwanji?
Reply to ‘How are you?’ Zimkomo, kaya inu?
Ndiri bwino, kaya inu?
Ndiri bwino, kaya anzathu?
Long time no see Papita thawi tisanaonane
What’s your name? Dzina lanu ndani?
Dzina lanu ndi yani?
My name is … Dzina langa ndi …
Where are you from? Mumachokera kuti?
I’m from … Ndimachokera ku …
Pleased to meet you Ndakondwera kukudziwani
Good morning
(Morning greeting)
Mwauka bwanji?
Mwadzuka bwanji?
Ndadzuka bwino (reply)
Good afternoon
(Afternoon greeting)
Mwaswela bwanji?
Ndaswela bwin (reply)
Good evening
(Evening greeting)
Mwachoma bwanji
Ndachoma bwino (reply)
Good night Usiku wabwino
Gonani bwino (sleep well)
Mugone bwino (sleep well)
Goodbye
(Parting phrases)
Ndapita (I’m going)
Yendani Bwino (Go well)
Tsalani bwino (Stay well)
Pitani bwino (Go well)
Tionana (See you later)
Tionana mawa (See you tomorrow)
Good luck! Mafuna abwino
Cheers! Good Health!
(Toasts used when drinking)
Have a nice day Mukhale ndi tsiku labwino
Bon appetit /
Have a nice meal
Bon voyage /
Have a good journey
Yendani bwino
Muyende bwino
Yes Ee
Eya
Inde
No Iyayi
Ayi
Maybe Kapena
I don’t know Sindidziwa
I understand Ndamvetsetsa
I don’t understand Sindimvetsa
Sindikumvetsa
Sindikunvetsani
Please speak more slowly Chonde lankhulani pangono pangono
Please say that again Chonde mwati bwanji
Please write it down Chonde lembani
Do you speak English? Mumalankhula chizungu?
Mumalankhula chingelesi?
Do you speak Chichewa? Mumalankhula chicheŵa?
Mumalankhula chicheŵa?
Yes, a little
(reply to ‘Do you speak …?’)
Eya, pangono
Speak to me in Chichewa Ndilankhuleni mu Chichewa
How do you say … in Chichewa? Mumati chiyani … mu Chichewa?
Excuse me Pepani
How much is this? Ndalama zingati?
Sorry Pepani
Please Chonde
Thank you Zikomo
Zikomo kwambiri
Reply to thank you
Where’s the toilet? Chimbudzi chili kuti?
This gentleman will pay for everything Mbambo uyu alipila zonse
This lady will pay for everything Mzimayi uyu alipila zonse
Would you like to dance with me? Ungafune kuvina ndi ine?
I miss you Ndakusowa
I love you Ndimakukonda
Ndimakukondani
Ndimakukondanso (I love you too)
Ndimakukondaninso (I love you too)
Get well soon Pezanibwino mwa msanga
Go away! Choka!
Leave me alone! Ndilekeni!
Ndisiyeni!
Help! Mundithandize!
Ndithadizeni
Fire! Moto!
Stop! Ima!
Call the police! Itanani a police!
Christmas and New Year greetings Sangalalani pa Khirisimasi
Chaka chatsopano (Happy New Year)
Easter greetings
Birthday greetings Sangalalani pa tsiku la chibadwi chanu (frm/pl)
Sangalalani pa tsiku la chibadwi chako (inf)
One language is never enough Chilankhulo chimodzi sichokwanila
My hovercraft is full of eels
Why this phrase?

Some phrases provided by Yamikani Ken Jnr Chalira

If you would like to make any corrections or additions to this page, or if you can provide recordings, please contact me.

 

 

 

 

 


VISA’s

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Passport holders from Botswana, Malawi, Mauritius, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe can enter for up to 90 days without a visa.

 

All other nationalities can obtain a visa on arrival valid for 30 days for US$50. This visa may be extended to 60 days. You may need to show proof of an onward/return ticket and proof of accommodation.

 

NB If you are travelling with minor children to or from South Africa or even if your travels are just “in transit” through South Africa then please read the following guidelines.

http://www.home-affairs.gov.za/files/Brochures/Immigrationleaflet.pdf

 

 

Useful Links  

 

Tourism

http://www.visitmozambique.net/

Advisories

https://travel.gc.ca/destinations/mozambique

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/international-travel/International-Travel-Country-Information-Pages/mozambique.html

Health

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/traveler/none/mozambique

Customs

https://mozambique.visahq.com/customs

VISAS

http://mozambiquehighcommission.org.uk/

Driving in Mozambique

http://www.atcm.org.mz/download/Tourism/mozambique_tourism.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weather
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The Mozambique weather is ideal for tourism related activities all around the year.

Mozambique crosses the tropic of Capricorn giving the country of Mozambique a tropical climate with plenty of sunshine all through the year it rarely gets cold.
The average temperature is around 28°C, and the weather along the coast is sunny and warm even in midwinter.
The Mozambique weather is characterized by seasonal rains at a specific time of the year.
The rainy season is from November to April and the temperatures can get very hot and humid, particularly between December and February. A few spells of rain occur during the months of April to May and rain is very unusual between June and November.
Mozambique enjoys an average of 8 to 9 hours of sunshine daily throughout the year.
Climate varies according to area.
Inland is cooler than the coast and rainfall higher as the land rises, with most rain between January and March.

Temperatures and rainfall patterns vary greatly between the regions of the country. The areas along Mozambique’s north-eastern coast are the hottest and most humid in the country, while the high-altitude regions in the Nampula and Niassa provinces are the coolest. Conditions along the coast can be oppressively hot and humid, while inland the cooler nights relieve the heat of the day.

Source https://www.mozambiquetravelservice.com/general…

 

What!!!  You need more info?  Well then look at the following:

STILL TO BE DONE !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!